Difference between revisions of "Babak rahimi"

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'''Babak Rahimi''' earned his PhD from the European University Institute, Florence, Italy (2004) and obtained an M.A. in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (1997). In 2000-2001, he was a Visiting Fellows at the Department of Anthropology, the London School of Economics and Political Science. His monograph, Theater-State and Formation of the Early Modern Public Sphere in Iran: Studies on Safavid Muharram Rituals, 1590-1641 C.E. (Brill 2011), traces the origins of the Iranian public sphere in the early-seventeenth century Safavid Empire with a focus on the relationship between state-building, urban space and ritual culture.<ref>[http://literature.ucsd.edu/people/faculty/brahimi.html The university of California San diego]</ref>
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'''Babak Rahimi''' earned his PhD from the European University Institute, Florence, Italy (2004) and obtained an M.A. in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (1997). In 2000-2001, he was a Visiting Fellows at the Department of Anthropology, the London School of Economics and Political Science. His monograph, Theater-State and Formation of the Early Modern Public Sphere in Iran: Studies on Safavid Muharram Rituals, 1590-1641 C.E. (Brill 2011), traces the origins of the Iranian public sphere in the early-seventeenth century Safavid Empire with a focus on the relationship between state-building, urban space and ritual culture.
 
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Revision as of 15:08, 17 May 2018

Babak Rahimi earned his PhD from the European University Institute, Florence, Italy (2004) and obtained an M.A. in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (1997). In 2000-2001, he was a Visiting Fellows at the Department of Anthropology, the London School of Economics and Political Science. His monograph, Theater-State and Formation of the Early Modern Public Sphere in Iran: Studies on Safavid Muharram Rituals, 1590-1641 C.E. (Brill 2011), traces the origins of the Iranian public sphere in the early-seventeenth century Safavid Empire with a focus on the relationship between state-building, urban space and ritual culture.

Babak rahimi.jpg




Works and researches

Rahimi is also the co-editor (David Faris) of Social Media in Iran (SUNY Press 2015) also (Armando Salvatore and Roberto Tottoli) The Wiley Blackwell History of Islam (Wiley Blackwell). His articles have appeared in Thesis Eleven: Critical Theory and Historical Sociology, International Political Science Review, International Communication Gazette, International Journal of Middle East Studies, The Middle East Journal, The Communication Review, and Journal of the International Society for Iranian Studies. Rahimi has been an expert guest on various media programs like The News Hour with Jim Lehrer, BBC and CNN, in addition to NPR and On the Media. He has also been a visiting scholar at the Internet Institute, University of Oxford (2010) and the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania (2012). Rahimi was also a Senior Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace, Washington DC (2005-2006). Rahimi’s research interests concern the relationship between culture, religion and technology. The historical and social contexts that inspire his research range from early modern Islamicate societies to contemporary Iran.

Articles and books

  • Theater State and the Formation of Early Modern Public Sphere in Iran: Studies on Safavid Muharram Rituals , 1590-1641 C.D., Brill, 2011.
  • "Censorship and the Islamic Republic: Two Modes of Regulatory Measures for Media in Iran," The Middle East Journal , 69 (3), summer 2015, p. 358-378.
  • “Authority and Democracy in Shi‘i Islamic Jurisprudence: Montazeri, Sistani and Democratic Usulism” International Political Science Review , 2012.
  • “Exodus in Islam: Citatinality and Redemption,” Israel’s Exodus in Transdisciplinary Perspective: Text, Archaeology, Culture, and Geoscience , Tom Levy, ed., Ashgate, 2015.

Sources

The university of California San Diego

References